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LITERATURE (DRAMA & POETRY)

(NUMBER 11)

The poem’s persona atmosphere has a relaxed and hopeful tone to it. The poet’s attitude toward the subject of love is passionate and hopeful about his relationship with his love.

The poet laments bitterly the life he led before meeting his current love because he sees it as a waste of effort, time, and energy at the start of the poem. He refers to such pointless experiences as “childish” and “play.” Because he was completely unaware of himself when the love was consummated, his previous love (relationship) cannot be considered genuine. Because it makes the lovers immortal, the union in question is more self-sufficient and perfect than hemispheres.

It’s likely that the persona’s previous love life was a shambles and full of deception, in comparison to the newfound love, which is more perfect than life itself. The poet then goes on to use conceit to compare himself and his beloved, using the far-fetched metaphor of “Seven Sleepers Den” to express that their entire lives had been meaningless and unconscious. If they had any fort of pleasures and joy, it was all a figment of their imagination. “If ever any beauty I did see; which I desired, and got it’ was but a dream of thee,” the poet writes in praise of his beloved.

Continue With WAEC Literature 2022 Drama & Poetry Answers

(10)
The poem addresses Africa’s leadership crisis, as well as the lingering problem of our inability to find a credible and transparent leader who is brave, courageous, fearless, and compassionate, due to a lack of trust. The forest animals in the poem don’t trust one another to take over as the animal kingdom’s leader. “When the zebra asserts his right to lead, the pack points to his striped duplicity.” “The elephant trudges into a power struggle/but his fellow elephants fear his trampling feet”… Consequently, despite their facial qualifications, the zebra and elephant are unfit to rule because they lack good leadership qualities.

The African masses, on the other hand, do not trust one another to take over the country’s leadership role. This lack of trust is caused by religious and ethnic diversity, with a Hausa man preferring to vote or bequeath power to his fellow brother regardless of leadership quality, whereas an Ibo man believes that only his brother, who is a Christian and belongs to the Ibo tribe, is capable of leading.

Also, the king of the jungle believes he is capable of leading, but when a loyal follower recalls his ferocious (violent) nature and how he unleashes it on the weaker animals, he reconsiders his attitude toward him. Even hyenas and giraffes are unable to lead because they lack both vision and trust.

It is clear from this poem that it is to blame for underdevelopment not only in Africa, but also in Nigeria. The animals aren’t united enough in the poem to stand up to the lion, who “…stakes his claim to leadership of the pack.” Because the led, that is, the followers, do not have one voice and cannot change their situation, his dominance and ability to lord it over and subdue other animals cannot be properly checked. Hyena claims he is qualified and credible enough to lead the animal kingdom to new heights, but impalas claim he is unable to do so due to his deadly appetite for dead animal meats. The animals are at odds with one another because they can’t agree on who should lead them. This lack of unity and oneness among the animals is comparable to the lack of unity among African leaders and the masses. This is largely due to the religious and ethnic diversity of the masses, which explains why they are unable to choose a qualified leader from among themselves and instead must band together against the ruling class in order to wrest power from them.

The persona tries to suggest a likely solution to the problem of disunity among our leaders near the poem’s end. “A good leader should be “tough as a tiger, compassionate as a doe / transparent as a river, mysterious as a lake,” according to the author. A leader who possesses the aforementioned quality can inspire people to strive for change and unity.

Literature in English Drama & Poetry Continuation

Number 12

THEME OF SUFFERING

The “Journey of the Magi” is a one-of-a-kind journey. It all starts and ends with pain, and the Magi have a lot of it along the way, what with all the bad weather and even worse people. But there’s more suffering going on here than meets the eye. There’s the psychological anguish of the dying Magi culture, as well as the physical and mental anguish we know Jesus will face as he grows up to become Christ. So, how do we interpret all of this? We believe Eliot is reminding us that much of spirituality and religion is based on suffering, and that suffering is frequently associated with religious transformation.

The theme of suffering is unmistakable in the poem, and it is linked to other themes.

Death is one of the aspects of the theme of suffering that is depicted. The loss of their traditions to impending Christianity is akin to staring death and defeat in the face at the same time for the Magi. Death doesn’t show up until the very end of “Journey of the Magi,” but when it does, it puts a fine point on what the arrival of Jesus means to the Magi and their people.

Religion is yet another aspect of the poem’s theme of suffering. The birth of Jesus, the three kings, and a plethora of Biblical allusions Religion is written all over “Journey of the Magi,” and that’s just the obvious stuff. Because the poem is about the arrival of Christianity, each word is dense with religious connotations that can be sifted through with a fine-toothed comb. Allow Shmoop to take over.

In the poem “the journey of the Magi,” fear also promotes the theme of suffering. In “Journey of the Magi,” there are two distinct layers of terror. First, there’s the fear of the Magus as a character – the kind that’s pretty obvious by the end of the poem. Then there’s the type of fear that the first type implies. Now, before you start wondering what Shmoop is talking about, let us explain: Eliot is secretly telling us about his own fears surrounding his recent religious conversion by making the Magus a character who is extremely wary of spiritual change. After all, Eliot grew up without much of a spiritual upbringing, and while his conversion to Anglicanism was undoubtedly his choice, it did not come easily. Which is perhaps why, in this poem, fear is unleashed with all guns blazing.

 

The poem also discusses the suffering of tradition. Traditions are being questioned left and right in the “Journey of the Magi.” The birth of Jesus evokes a strange sense of impending doom, as well as the realization that the Magi’s old way of life is long gone. You’d think that a poem about Jesus’ birth would be overjoyed at the prospect of ushering in a new era of religious awe, but this poem is mostly lamenting the loss of a long-gone era. Eliot, it’s me, Eliot, Eliot, Eliot, Eliot, Almost every time he drank, his glass was half-empty. If not completely shattered.

It is clear that the poet used a variety of themes to explain the theme of suffering, which is the most Dominant.

LITERATURE 2022 WAEC (DRAMA & POETRY)

(6)
Since his wife reminds him of everything he despises from the beginning, Jimmy attacks Alison both verbally and physically throughout the play. Jimmy verbally assaults Alison and her family members because he wants her to respond to a question about a newspaper article, which Alison denies because she has not yet read it. He humiliates and attacks Alison and her brother, Nigel.

Alison, in contrast to Jimmy, does not respond directly to Jimmy’s aggressive behavior. She prefers to keep her mouth shut. She understands that if she responds to his attack in any way, he will win. Alison’s apparent ignorance and silence can also be used as a weapon to protect her from Jimmy’s assaults. Jimmy doesn’t just attack Alison; he also targets her family and friends. “Militant, arrogant, and full of malice,” he says of her parents.

He labels her friends “sycophantic phlegmatic and of course, top of the bill pusillanimous.

Jimmy also despises Alison’s mother for her dedication to her middle school classrooms and her fear of her daughter marrying a man of lower social status, to the point where she hired a detective to keep an eye on Jimmy because he doesn’t trust him. This irritates him because he values middle-class values. As a result, he refers to Alison’s mother as a “old bitch” who should be dead.

As a result, Jimmy’s rage at every member of the cast can be traced back to his difficult upbringing and the loss of his childhood. Because he claims he was exposed to death, loneliness, and pain at a young age, Jimmy is frail and insecure.

 

LITERATURE 2022 WAEC (DRAMA & POETRY)

(8)
Gabriel, also known as Gabe, is Troy’s mentally disturbed brother. He was injured in the Second World War and required a metal plate to be surgically implanted into his head due to a head injury. He receives a check from the government, which Troy used to purchase the Maxson’s home, which serves as the play’s setting. When Gabriel wandered around the neighborhood singing and carrying a basket, he provided some comic relief. On Judgment Day, he imagines himself as the angel Gabriel, who, with his trumpet, opens the gates of heaven for Saint Peter.

However, shortly before the play begins, Gabriel has moved in with a lady named Miss. Pearl, and Troy, fearful of losing Gabe’s disability check, commits him to a mental institution and continues to receive half of Gabe’s check.

LITERATURE (DRAMA & POETRY)

LITERATURE (DRAMA & POETRY)

(4)
A playwright’s device in which the characters of a play perform brief dramatic sketches during the course of the play is known as a play-within-a-play. In “The dance of the lost traveler,” it is used as a form of flashback to enact the experience of the Lagos visitor. The audience gets a glimpse into the ordeal of the first-time visitor to Lagos, who has car problems and has to abandon it in order to continue his exploration on foot.

The second play dramatizes Baroka’s bribery of the surveyor in order to divert the railway track away from llunjunle.

The third play is titled “The dance of virility used to mock Baroka,” and it consists of a mix of music, mime, and movement intended to entertain the characters.

(7)

Troy, whose income is insufficient to meet his family’s needs, is preoccupied with dragging the family name into the mud.

As a result, Troy struggles to fulfill his responsibilities as a father and husband to his wife. Before his death, he does not accomplish much. As his son Cory turns against him and becomes a rebel, the family he ruled with an iron hand or harshness is torn apart. He vows not to attend Troy’s funeral after leveling serious criticism on how Troy tormented his life and dreams for a better future.

Troy’s adulterous act with Alberta, Cory laments bitterly, contributes to Troy’s backwardness and family disintegration. Because Rose has vowed never to have anything to do with Troy, especially when news of Alberta’s pregnancy for “Troy” comes in, the nature of trust between Rose and Troy is broken here.

“Your daddy wanted you to be everything he wasn’t… and at the same time he tried to make you everything he was… he meant to do more good than he meant to do harm,” Rose cautions Cory, demonstrating Rose’s embodiment of unity and family rebirth. Troy sees Rose as a good woman who can bring the family together when he says…

Rose also forgives Troy and agrees to raise Raynell, Troy and Alberta’s illegitimate daughter who died shortly after birth, in order to promote peace, harmony, and family integration in the Maxsons.

 

WAEC LITERATURE 2022 Answers (DRAMA & POETRY)

(3)
The primary conflict in the play is the contrast between tradition and modernity in the aftermath of early colonialism. The conflict between Baroka and Lakunle for Sidi’s hand in marriage represents the Yoruba customs in opposition to a western conception of progress and modernity. Lakunle, who represents the modern Nigerian man, dresses in Western attire, speaks and acts like an Englishman, and was presumably educated in a British school. His greatest ambition is to transform llunjunle into a modern paradise akin to Lagos. He actively despises his village’s traditional customs and the people who support them. When Lakunle refuses to pay Sidi’s bride price, this is best exemplified.

He goes on to say that the bride price is “an ignoble customs, infamous, ignominy / sharing our heritage before the world” and that “paying the price would be / buying a heifer off the market stall / you’d be my chattel, my mere property.” This implies that Lakunle equates such behavior to a simple process of buying and selling goods and commodities, which is in direct opposition to his Western conception of marriage. Because of Lakunle’s refusal, converting Sidi to his way of thinking, views, and ideas into a “modern wife” is far more important than marrying her. “Within a year or two, you’ll have machines that can do / without getting in your eyes.” “Sidi, I do not seek a wife / To fetch and carry / To cook and scrub / To bring forth children by the gross; I seek a life-companion,” Lakunle says, “I do not seek a wife / To fetch and carry / To cook and scrub / To bring forth children by the gross; I seek a life-companion.”

On the other hand, Baroka is an anti-modernist who is adamant about preserving the village’s traditional way of life. Baroka paid off a surveyor not to build train tracks through the outskirts of llunjunle, preventing the village from experiencing the modern world, according to Lakunle, who finds Baroka’s lifestyle and views archaic. Baroka also shows that he does not despise modernity or progress, and that he does not want it imposed on him or the village’s way of life distorted in the name of civilization and progress. Baroka wishes to add Sidi to his many wives, all of whom are fully accepted by the land’s customs, whereas Lakunle fantasizes about having only one wife, as dictated by western culture. Sidi will become the head wife of the new Bale when Baroka dies, according to tradition, making her one of the most powerful women in llunjunle. She opts for traditional marriage as soon as she realizes that modern marriage may make her less powerful due to fewer rights. Baroka wins the fight for Sidi’s hand in marriage in the end. This demonstrates that African ways of life continue to reign supreme over Western culture, which appears to be more complex, complicated, and incomprehensible.

The play investigates the clash of two distinct cultures, specifically the conflict between African and European customs or ways of life, as well as traditional and modernity. As the selfish Baroka bribes the surveyor to divert the railway track away from llunjunle, thereby foiling the intended progress in the village, the proponent of traditional culture tries hard to prevent the advent of western civilization and foreign values into the village. This clash can also be seen when a visitor from Lagos (Photo Journalist), the birthplace of western civilization, makes the indigenous culture less appealing by causing a stir during his visit to llunjunle. His camera is described as a “one-eyed box” and his car as “the devil’s own horse” by the public. Sidi’s ego is boosted by the photographs on the cover and inside of Lagos Man’s Magazine, and she almost forgets about her relationship with Baroka as her growing fame takes precedence.

 

WAEC LITERATURE DRAMA & POETRY A

(1)
The attitude of men toward women can be seen in the characters of Lamboi, Musa, and others in Yoko’s chiefdom, as well as in the spate of betrayal, cheap blackmail, and deception. For example, in order to prevent a woman from assuming the enviable position of chief in Senehun, Lamboi, Yoko’s blood brother, conspires with Musa, the seer and medicine man, to assassinate chief Gbanya when it is clear that he will pass the power to his wife. As a result, Yoko Lamboi instructs Musa to do it, and when he refuses, he is fired. Lamboi threatened to reveal Musa’s dark past, which includes the murders of Yattah’s son and Mama Kidi’s daughter.

Because Musa has a priest-like role to play as one who is supposed to protect the land and Gbanya, the chief of Senehun, the thought of being exposed to the general public propels Musa to betray the chief and the entire community.

Musa, on the other hand, continues his nefarious activities with his accomplice Lamboi. This time, Yoko’s strategy is to not only make Moyamba uncontrollable for her, but also to implicate her and turn the public against her. Lamboi collaborates with Musa to kidnap and murder Ndapi and Jilo’s daughter. When it’s completed, both will incite women and others to revolt against the Queen. The public would be reliably informed that Yoko used her as a sacrifice in order to gain more power so that the Governor would be at her beck and call and her reign would be rendered useless and unstable.

 

NUMBER (2)

GBANYA AS A REMARKABLE CHARACTER

Even when they disagree, Beneatha appreciates his peaceful demeanor and calm demeanor. Asagai appears to be Beneatha’s savior from the potential tragedy of her eventually becoming George’s wife, in contrast to George Murchison’s abrasive put-downs of Beneatha and George’s insistence on maintaining his narrow-minded views. To put it another way, Asagai is helpful and concerned about others’ well-being. He offers Beneatha much-needed consolation and sound advice when she is at her lowest point, and he volunteers to help with the move to Clybourne Park. He counsels Beneatha spiritually and emotionally, helping her to get back “on track” as she rails against her brother’s foolishness in having lost the money.
He is persistent but never overbearing, and he was used in the play to make a radical point about race. He flatters her with gifts (which George Murchison has not done); additionally, Asagai’s gifts are not meaningless trinkets, but items that are both useful and desired by Beneatha, such as the Nigerian robes for which he clearly went to great lengths. Asagai’s compliments to Beneatha are genuine, making them credible.

 

Continue to See WAEC Literature Answers 2022

LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
SECTION D
NON-AFRICAN POETRY
NUMBER 12

(1) DEATHS
The loss of their traditions to impending Christianity is akin to staring death and defeat in the face at the same time for the Magi. Death doesn’t show up until the very end of “Journey of the Magi,” but when it does, it puts a fine point on what the arrival of Jesus means to the Magi and their people.
(2) RELIGIONS
The birth of Jesus, the three kings, and a plethora of Biblical allusions Religion is written all over “Journey of the Magi,” and that’s just the obvious stuff. Because the poem is about the arrival of Christianity, each word is dense with religious connotations that can be sifted through with a fine-toothed comb. Allow Shmoop to take over.
(3) FEAR
In “Journey of the Magi,” there are two distinct layers of terror. First, there’s the fear of the Magus as a character – the kind that’s pretty obvious by the end of the poem. Then there’s the type of fear that the first type implies. Allow us to explain: by making the Magus a character who is extremely wary of spiritual change, Eliot is secretly telling us about his own fears surrounding his recent religious conversion. After all, Eliot grew up without much of a spiritual upbringing, and while his conversion to Anglicanism was undoubtedly his choice, it did not come easily. Which is maybe why fear comes out with guns a-blazin’ in this poem.
(4) TRADITION and CUSTOMS
Traditions are being questioned left and right in the “Journey of the Magi.” The birth of Jesus evokes a strange sense of impending doom, as well as the realization that the Magi’s old way of life is long gone. You’d think that a poem about Jesus’ birth would be overjoyed at the prospect of ushering in a new era of religious awe, but this poem is mostly lamenting the loss of a long-gone era. Eliot, it’s me, Eliot, Eliot, Eliot, Eliot, Almost every time he drank, his glass was half-empty. If not completely shattered.
(5) SUFFERING
The “Journey of the Magi” is a one-of-a-kind journey. It all starts and ends with pain, and the Magi have a lot of it along the way, what with all the bad weather and even worse people. But there’s more suffering going on here than meets the eye. There’s the psychological anguish of the dying Magi culture, as well as the physical and mental anguish we know Jesus will face as he grows up to become Christ. So, how do we interpret all of this? We believe Eliot is reminding us that much of spirituality and religion is based on suffering, and that suffering is frequently associated with religious transformation.

 

NUMBER (1)

Women are not treated equally to men in Senehun and Mendeland as a whole. Women are viewed as weak, vulnerable, and incapable of dealing with crises. When Gbanya drags Yoko into the inner chamber at the start of the play, he claims that he needs Yoko more than her Sande girls. According to him, women’s only responsibility is to satisfy men’s sexual desires.

Gbanya had initially promised Yoko that she would be his successor. However, given the current state of affairs, he is hesitant to hand over the throne to her, believing that women are incapable of managing a war-torn country. Lamboi takes the same stance. He claims that he wants to assassinate Gbanya because he does not want him to appoint Yoko as his successor.

Women are usually not allowed into the Poro cult in Mendeland. The only exception is Yoko Ono. There is some prejudice held against women in the village. Women are treated as second-class citizens, with the exception of Yoko Ono, who takes the initiative.

 

More Literature Drama & Poetry Answers 

Number 11

The Persona concludes that the previous life could not have been significant. It’s only possible that:

(i) A childlike experience of no substances and no seriousness.

(ii) A dreamlike experience which wouldn’t be anywhere near the profound love life they now have

(iii) A life of no meaning or a life lived in a state of sleep.

THUS;
True love, unlike other types of love based on lust and benefits, will never die, according to the poetic persona. Other types of love are temporal and ephemeral, whereas true love is permanent and eternal.

 

WAEC Literature Prose Answers 2022

Please remember to rephrase the answers

 

WAEC Literature 2022 Answers Now Ready 100%

(NUMBER 7)

When Lockwood becomes dissatisfied with the household activities at Grange, he returns to Wuthering Heights. The weather is cold this time of year, and the ground is frozen. He yells at Joseph, his servant, to open the door. In the kitchen, he meets a young girl whom he assumes to be Mrs. Heathcliff. He tries to strike up a conversation with her, but she is consistently rude, which embarrasses Lockwood. Unless Heathcliff commands it, the lady refuses to make him tea. The young man also shows up and acts rudely, as if he suspects Lockwood of making advances toward the girl.

When Heathcliff enters and demands tea “savagely,” Lockwood is chastised for mistaking the young girl for Heathcliff’s wife. Heathcliff’s daughter-in-law, whose husband is dead, is the girl in question. Hareton Earnshaw is the young man. Lockwood asks for a guide so he can safely return home, but he is turned down. He is abandoned and ignored by everyone, and when he attempts to steal a lantern, Joseph accuses him of stealing it and sets dogs on him. Hareton and Heathcliff guffaw at his embarrassment.

Lockwood’s later visit to Withering Highly provides foreshadowing for the novel’s conclusion. Lockwood visits Wuthering Heights and delivers Cathy a note from Ellen. Hareton initially took the note, but when she noticed Cathy’s tears, she returned it to her. She, on the other hand, is cool with him and mocks his attempt at reading. Hareton, embarrassed, throws his book into the fire.

This is something Heathcliff did not expect, and it appears to be bothering him. Heathcliff must deal with Hareton’s resemblance to his aunt Catherine in addition to his memories of his lost love. Heathcliff is very concerned about these memories.

 

(NUMBER 5)

At the liberty paint plant, the narrator has an encounter with Kimbro.

The narrator’s arrival at the paint plant is uneventful, as he must cross a bridge in the fog, implying that he is unable to see beyond his immediate surroundings. Mr. Kimbro, the narrator’s boss, is dispatched to him. This man gives orders and tells the workers not to ask any questions. The narrator’s first job is with the company’s famous pure white paint. The paint turns a dull grey underneath the white when the narrator mixes the wrong ingredient into the paint because he is afraid to ask Kimbro questions. When Kimbro notices the difference, he is fired from his job and assigned to another Boss, Mr. Brockway, who works as a sort of engineer in the basement. Before hiring the narrator, Brockway grills him with questions about his background.

The Narrator had another bad encounter with his new boss after Kimbro fired him, and it was at the point of explanation that the new Boss Brockway exploded in anger over his participation in a union. Brockway attacks him physically, refusing to listen to his explanation. Mr. Brockway’s teeth are knocked out as the narrator becomes enraged. The pressure rises above the set limit due to the narrator’s inattention to the room’s gauges; the narrator tries unsuccessfully to bring the value back under control. When the tank bursts, the narrator is knocked out.

 

MORE WAEC LITERATURE QUESTUION & ANSWERS 2022

(3)
As Massa’s illness worsens, Nii decides to take her to a spiritualist home. The spiritualist’s caring powder only alleviated the frequent stools. The journey to the village is tumultuous and exhausting. Massa, on the other hand, is unable to complete the journey and passes out in the vehicle. Nii begs the driver to take them to a nearby hospital for medical help, but he refuses. Nii is ushered into an office to pay for service at the hospital mortuary when she arrives. He must pay a daily fee of one hundred cedis, which must be increased if the body is kept at the mortuary for more than three days. Nii is preoccupied with a variety of issues, including the cost of transporting the body, the cost of burial, the coffin, clothing, and beverages. Nii moved on, leaving Massa’s body behind.

Mama and Joe have identified Massa as the brother’s late wife, and they are both transporting Massa’s body to Sampa village for burial. The procession to the cemetery is a beautiful sight to behold. The residents of the town greeted them warmly and expressed gratitude for their efforts in bringing Massa’s body home. Mama discovered one thing about Massa: she was an adopted child who hadn’t been back to the village in a long time.

It was at this point that the massa received a proper burial.

 

SECTION B

(6)
Ras uses poetry to represent white men’s perceptions and treatment of black people.
From the beginning of the poem, the poet uses rhetorical questions. In stanza 2, the poet laments that if Africans “Cry roughly” about their sufferings, which he refers to as “… the beginning of things,” he wonders who will watch their “large mouths” when they yell for help.
In stanza 3, the poet continues to lament that no one will be emotional (represented by ‘heart’) enough to listen to their ‘clamouring,’ and that if they do realize their predicament and become angry, no one will listen to them because he considers any late realization and anger to be ‘pitiful.’ The poet supports the belief that the dead serve as ancestors and protect the living from evil forces in stanzas 4 and 5. The poet speculates in these stanzas that when the living die (our dead) and meet their ancestors (their dead) whose advice has fallen on deaf ears and whose “wild appeals” have gone unheeded, they (the living, now dead) will remember their warnings and regret not ever listening. The poet goes on to say that they (the forefathers) left their signs on the earth, water, and air for their “blind, deaf, and unworthy sons” who see “nothing” they have created. In stanza 6, the poet continues, wondering who will hear their’sobbing hearts’ when they ‘weep gently’ because they did not heed their ancestors’ advice.

 

More Literature WAEC 2022 Prose Answers 

SECTION B

(8)

Cathy Linton and Hareton Earnshaw are members of the second generation of residents at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange in Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights.

Catherine Earnshaw is Cathy’s mother. Hindley Earnshaw is Hareton’s father.
Catherine and Hindley Earnshaw were siblings who first lived with their parents at Wuthering Heights.

Catherine and Edgar Linton have a daughter named Cathy Linton.

Hindley Earnshaw and Isabella Linton have a son named Hareton Earnshaw. Since his father’s death, Hareton has been raised by Heathcliff and treated as a servant. Heathcliff also has a son, Linton, who has been living with him since Linton’s mother, Isabella, died. Isabella is also Edgar’s sister.

Cathy is first introduced to Hareton when she travels to Wuthering Heights to visit her cousin, Linton. When she sees Hareton, she assumes he is a stable boy and begins to order him around.

Cathy and Hareton have fallen in love at the end of Wuthering Heights. Their relationship mirrors almost identically the love Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff once shared.

Cathy and Hareton have developed a strong, loving relationship, and will undoubtedly soon be married.

Cathy, who has long despised Hareton, finally relents, offering to teach him to read and making overtures of friendship. Hareton, enraged that she blames him for their past animosity, initially rejects her, but he soon softens, and the cousins form an amicable truce that quickly develops into something more.

When Hareton forbids Cathy from speaking ill of Heathcliff, Cathy, with a growing maturity based on love, decides that it would be cruel to keep trying to persuade Hareton that Heathcliff has treated him badly, realizing that “he was attached by ties stronger than reason could break,” they overcome their biggest obstacle.

In Chapter 32, as Nelly observes Hareton and Cathy huddle like innocent, happy children over a book, she writes, “their intimacy thus commenced grew rapidly. Both minds tending to the same point – one loving and desiring to esteem, and the other loving and desiring to be esteemed – they contrived in the end to reach it.” She believes their eventual union is unavoidable, describing it as “the crown of all my wishes.”

 

WAEC Literature 2022 Answers Continuation

(3) HOW MASSA IS BURIED
MASSA IS BURIED TO THE POET IN THE ABOVE POET, THE SUMMER HAS MANY DEFECTS, IN COMPARISON TO HIS FAVORITE. In other words, she goes on to list the ways in which she surpasses it. To begin with, he claims that a summer day isn’t as lovely or temperate as she is. “Rough winds shake the darling buds” and “summer’s lease hath all too short a date” are two examples of how summer can be extreme, even volatile, and how it does not last very long before giving way to autumn. Furthermore, summer can be “too hot” at times, and the sun can disappear for an extended period of time (when “his gold complexion” is “dimm’d”). Furthermore, the beauty of nature has a tendency to “declin[e]” over time. The speaker’s love, on the other hand, exists in a “eternal summer” because her beauty will never fade; he has immortalized her and her beauty in these lines, and she is thus superior to literal summer. As a result, the summer’s flaws make it impossible to compare to the poet’s favorite.

 

SECTION A

(1)

Beneatha is being courted by lawyer Nweze. He is persistent in his pursuit of her affections, but never overbearing. He flatters her with gifts (which George Murchison has not done); additionally, Asagai’s gifts are not meaningless trinkets, but items that are both useful and desired by Beneatha, such as the Nigerian robes for which he clearly went to great lengths. Asagai’s compliments to Beneatha are genuine, which makes them credible. Even when they disagree, Beneatha appreciates his peaceful demeanor and calm demeanor. Asagai appears to be Beneatha’s savior from the potential tragedy of her eventually becoming George’s wife, in contrast to George Murchison’s abrasive put-downs of Beneatha and George’s insistence on maintaining his narrow-minded views. To put it another way, Asagai is helpful and concerned about others’ well-being. He offers Beneatha much-needed consolation and sound advice when she is at her lowest point, and he volunteers to help with the move to Clybourne Park. He spiritually and emotionally counsels Beneatha, assisting her in getting back “on track” as she rails against her brother’s folly in losing the money.
In the play, he was used to make a controversial point about race.

 

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SECTION B
Literature in English Answers

Question 8
The relationship between Cathy and Heathcliff is the central theme of Emily Bront’s Wuthering Heights. The significance of Cathy and Heathcliff’s relationship remains a central mystery of the novel until the very end. In fact, the protagonist, Heathcliff, is the protagonist of the novel, which is a revengeful love story.

Mr. Earnshaw’s daughter Catherine is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earnshaw, and Heathcliff is a pickup boy from the slums of Liverpool named Heathcliff Earnshaw by Mr. Earnshaw. Mr. Earnshaw’s treatment of Heathcliff resembles that of a father to his own child. Both Cathy and Heathcliff have a better chance of developing their romantic love-affair because of the moor’s environment and the fact that they live in the same house. Furthermore, Cathy’s own brother Hindley’s hostile and cruel treatment of Heathliff tarnishes Cathy’s feelings for him.

As children, Cathy and Heathcliff appear to represent the spirit of Liberty, as they rebel against Hindley’s tyrannical authority. They are also protesting religious bigotry, as Joseph represents.

Their love is on a higher, spiritual plane; they are soul mates, two people who have an irresistible attraction to each other. Heathcliff refers to Catherine as his soul on several occasions.

A life-force relationship is a principle that is independent of everything else. Catherine and Heathcliff are in love because they believe they are the same person. “I am Heathcliff,” Catherine famously declares, while Heathcliff laments that he cannot live without his “soul,” referring to Catherine, after Catherine’s death.

Cathy and Heathcliff are deeply in love with one another. Cathy’s speech and actions, however, contain some ambiguity.

Cathy and Heathcliff are creatures of the wild moorland, where social conventions are irrelevant. Following her meeting with Edgar, Cathy expresses an interest in him. She appears to be equally interested in both Edgar and Heathcliff at this point. She hasn’t completely abandoned Heathcliff. In fact, she defines her brother Hindley and arranges a secret meeting with Heathcliff. In terms of behavior, appearance, and refinement, there is still a significant difference between Edgar and Heathcliff. And it’s understandable for a sweet fifteen-year-old girl to be conflicted about both of them, because one is her previous love, and the other appears later with more redefined and behavior.

Cathy chooses to marry Edgar because of his social standing. She chooses to marry Edgar because of his high social standing. He is indeed attractive, young, and cheerful. But she tells Nelly, the housekeeper, about her strong feelings for Heathcliff, saying

“Needless to say, he (Heathcliff) is more like me than I am. His and mine are made of the same stuff, whatever our sols are made of.”

But Heathcliff, who adores Cathy above all else, overhears Cathy saying to Nelley:

“To marry Heathcliff now would be degrading.”

He would not listen any longer as he walks away with his heart torn into several pieces and blood dripping from his ears inwardly. We can deduce from Cathy’s speech that the love affair between Cathy and Heathcliff is anti-social because Heathcliff is a pick-up boy, which is not a trait of his parents.

Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights without saying anything to anyone and without leaving any traces after overhearing such things.

Cathy marries Edgar after Heathcliff has left. She realizes her betrayal of her true self after her marriages, and as a result, she will become sicker and sicker as the days pass. Heathcliff returns after six months of marriage, and Cathy is overjoyed to see him alive. Cathy and Heathcliff sit looking at each other, despite Edgar’s displeasure, “absorbed in their mutual joy to suffer embarrassment.” However, there is no romantic erotic arousal.

Despite the fact that she is married to Edgar, she has an anti-social love and desire for Heathcliff. She considers Linton to be a subordinate and Heathcliff to be a part of her.

Heathcliff burst into Cathy’s room in Chapter 15, and she was in his arms in a flash. He begins to lavish her with kisses. Then Cathy admits that she is to blame for everything because she married Edgar even though she was in love with him (Heathcliff). She then requests another kiss from him.

After Cathy’s death, it has been twelve years. Heathcliff goes through a lot while also causing others to go through a lot.

Heathcliff bribes the Sexton to remove the earth from the lid of the coffin in which Cathy lay when Edgar Linton dies and the designs for Linton’s grave are being finalized. And has seen Cathy’s face again after opening the coffin lid. In fact, he dug out her grave with his own hands on this occasion. He has done this because of his colossal love for Cathy. However, from a social standpoint, what he has done for love is truly immoral.

He has also bribed the Sexton to remove one panel of the coffin, with the goal of burying his dead body next to Cathy’s dead body without a wall between them when he dies. His unfathomable love for Cathy drives him to do immoral things.

Finally, we can say that Heathcliff’s unwavering love becomes anti-moral and anti-social as a result of Cathy’s desire to achieve social status and his own psychological problems.

Wuthering Heights is a novel written by Emily Bronte. Catherine and Heathcliff’s love is a direct challenge to the tyrannical, oppressive, and restricting social forces of family and class that tyrannize, oppress, and restrict people and their relationships.

 

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SECTION A

(2)

Adah and Francis are similar in Second-Class Citizen in that they are both poor students at the start of the novel. They are nearly opposites in nearly every other way, as Adah is strong and determined to make a better life for herself, and she takes active steps to do so, whereas Francis denies his responsibilities and is weak, lazy, controlling, and abusive.

Both Adah and Francis are students when they marry, and both of them are poor. Despite the fact that Francis is unable to pay Adah’s bride price, she chooses him in the hopes of gaining some stability in her life so she can continue her education.

Adah and Francis, on the other hand, turn out to be two very different people with very different goals and personalities. Adah is a powerful woman with long-term goals and a strong desire to achieve them at all costs. She has a lot of difficulties, but she perseveres, working and caring for her children as best she can. She works hard to improve her life by finding jobs she enjoys and pursuing her passion for writing. Adah is both optimistic and pessimistic. While she wishes for things to improve in her life, she takes proactive steps to do so.

Adah is the polar opposite of Francis. He is frail and sluggish. He fails his exams instead of appreciating the educational opportunities he has been given. Then he accuses Adah of being to blame for his failures. Francis whines a lot when he has to go to work, accusing Adah of being lazy even when she is recovering from childbirth. Francis is also abusive and controlling. Despite the fact that Adah earns the majority of the family’s income, Francis considers it his. He also physically assaults Adah and emotionally attacks her. Out of spite and jealousy, he also burns his wife’s manuscript.

Francis refuses to even take responsibility for his children in the end. He denies having them and destroys the paperwork that proves it.

Or

Adah is a child of an Ibo from Ibuza, Nigeria, who lives in Lagos at the start of the novel. She has dreamed of moving to the United Kingdom since she was a child. Adah is sent to live with her uncle’s family after her father passes away.

She is able to continue her education in Nigeria and finds work as a library clerk for the American consulate. This job pays well enough for her to be a desirable bride to Francis (her future husband) and her in-laws.

Francis decides to study law in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Adah persuades her husband’s family that she and her children have a place in the United Kingdom as well. They are second-class citizens in the United Kingdom, according to Francis, because they are not British citizens. Adah finds work at another library and supports them financially, as well as providing primary care for their children.

As Adah pursues her dream of becoming a writer, Francis becomes increasingly abusive and dismissive of her.

 

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EXAMINATION SCHEME FOR WAEC 2022 Literature

If you’re wondering what the 2022 Waec Literature question paper will look like, you can get the main gist/expo here as we reveal and explain everything without holding anything back.

The Literature WAEC QUESTIONS paper in 2022 will be divided into two sections: objective and theory. Here are some hints about the content of these TWO sections. Please keep in mind that all (two) sections must be completed on the SAME DAY and within a specific time frame. Join us as we dissect the two sections of the Literature question paper for the year 2022.

2022 WAEC Literature paper 1: keep in mind that you will have to answer at least 50 questions in the object (OBJ) section, each of which is worth one mark, for a total of 50 marks.

2022 WAEC Literature paper 2: this is the theory section, where you will be required to answer only 5 questions out of a total of 11.

EXAMINATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE WAEC 2022 Literature EXAMINATION

  • If you aren’t told to, don’t open your booklet.
  • At the end of the exam, always write your name on the WAEC attendance sheet.
  • When shading your objectives questions, only use HB pencil.
  • Keep in mind that if you are caught with expo, your WAEC score may be withheld (it shall not be your portion amen)
  • Your names must be spelled correctly, and you must include the subject and exam number.
  • Literature does not requires calculations, so you don’t need to bring your calculator.
  • Before submitting, go over what you’ve written so far to make sure it’s free of errors.

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